Top Medical News & Ideas This Week

By: MedicalSearch
14 October, 2019

This week: The 2019 Nobel Prize in Medicine - Measles and the modern age - 40-year study finds odd link between being a slow walker and ageing faster - and more.

Each week MedicalSearch now brings you the most interesting, informative and entertaining medical related news stories and articles from Australia and around the world

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The 2019 Nobel Prize in Medicine: Here is what won the award

The Nobel Assembly announced on Monday that Dr. William G. Kaelin, Jr., Sir Peter J. Ratcliffe, and Dr. Gregg L. Semenza have been awarded the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for helping find ways that your body can sense and adapt to different levels of oxygen. - forbes.com

 

Patients face return trips to doctor under a proposed ban on antibiotic repeat prescriptions

A ban on repeat prescriptions for antibiotics could be just weeks away, according to Australia's chief medical officer. - abc.net.au

 

Measles and the modern age: the rise of vaccine-preventable diseases

Despite decades of dedicated work, vaccine-preventable diseases are on the rise. One noteworthy example is measles. Prior to the implementation of widespread vaccination programs, measles accounted for an estimated 2.6 million deaths annually across the globe. - hospitalhealth.com.au

 

GPs and their role in children’s mental health

It is well known that mental health issues are on the rise among Australians, with GPs identifying them as the leading concern in patient consultations. But it is less commonly known that mental health conditions are becoming more prevalent among the young, with one in seven young people aged between 4—17 experiencing a mental disorder. - racgp.org.au

 

40-year study finds odd link between being a slow walker and ageing faster

Being a slow walker doesn't just signify you enjoy a leisurely stroll. According to new research, walking with a slow gait could be a symptom of significant deficits in physical and cognitive health. - sciencealert.com

 

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